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Vitamin D concentration is associated with increased mortality in female nursing home residents

Vitamin D concentration is associated with increased mortality in female nursing home residents

Vitamin D deficiency is high among institutional elderly patients and studies have shown low vitamin D levels may be associated with increased risk of mortality.

2 min read

This Austrian study suggests that the majority of institutionalized female patients are vitamin D deficient during winter and that there was an inverse association of 25(OH)D and mortality.

  • Method:
    961 elderly female patients over the age of 70 years were recruited from nursing homes in Austria and the serum level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured in February and March.
     
  • Key findings:
    • Median 25(OH)D concentration was 17.5 nmol/L and 93% had 25(OH)D levels below 50 nmol/L (recommended level).
    • 284 patients died during a mean follow-up time of 27 ± 8 months.
    • When adjusted for age, those with 25(OH)D lower than 14 nmol/L had 1.49 increased risk of mortality compared to those with 25(OH)D higher than 25.5 nmol/L.
       
  • Conclusion:
    The majority of institutionalized female patients are vitamin D deficient during winter, and 25(OH)D level is inversely associated with mortality.

 

WYE-EM-025-FEB-15

Reference

Pilz S, Dobnig H, Tomaschitz A, Kienreich K, Meinitzer A, Friedl C, Wagner D, Piswanger-Sölkner C, März W, Fahrleitner-Pammer A. Low 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Is Associated with Increased Mortality in Female Nursing Home Residents. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Feb 8. [Epub ahead of print]. Link to PubMed