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[Guideline Summary] Summary of American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)

[Guideline Summary] Summary of American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)

Committee opinion on weight gain during pregnancy.

2 min read

The amount of weight gained during pregnancy can affect the immediate and future health of a woman and her infant.

Background:

Weight gain during pregnancy is closely related to the health of mothers and their infants. Latest guidelines by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) regarding gestational weight gain serve as a basis for clinic practice.
 

Summary:

  • To achieve best pregnancy, healthcare providers who care for pregnant women should:
    • Determine a woman's body mass index (BMI) at the initial prenatal visit.
    • Counsel her regarding the importance of appropriate weight gain, nutrition, exercise and the need to limit excessive weight gain. 
  • IOM gestational weight gain guidelines (Table 1) provide a clinicians basis for daily practice.
  • For twin pregnancy, IOM recommends the below gestational weight gain:
    • Women of normal weight: 37-54 Ib
    • Overweight women: 31-50 Ib
    • Obese women: 25-42 Ib


Table 1. IOM Weight Gain Recommendations for Pregnancy

Pregpregnancy Weight Category BMI Recommended Range of Total Weight (lb) Recommended Rates of Weight Gain*
in the Second and Thrid Trimesters (Ib) (Mean Range [Ib/wk])
Underweight < 18.5 28-40 1 (1-1.3)
Normal Weight 18.5-24.9 25-35 1 (0.8-1)
Overweight 25-29.9 15-25 0.6 (0.5-0.7)
Obese
(includes all classes)
> 30 11-20 0.5 (0.4-0.6)


Remark:
* Calculations assume a 1.1-4.4 Ib weight gain in the first trimester.


Link to ACOG

 

Reference

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Committee opinion no. 548: weight gain during pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol. 2013 Jan;121(1):210-2.

WYE-EM-004-JAN-15