Nutrition care during and after pregnancy by general practitioners

Monday, Jan 21, 2019

Reference:

Ball L, Wilkinson S. Nutrition care by general practitioners: Enhancing women's health during and after pregnancy. Aust Fam Physician. 2016 Aug;45(8):542-7. Link to Pubmed
 

Other articles that you might be interested in:

 

Background:

  • Healthy dietary habits before, during and after pregnancy help reduce the risk of undesirable health outcomes for both mothers and infants
  • Most pregnant women have ongoing and regular contact with general practitioners (GPs) and they are receptive to health-related messages
     

Objective:

  • To provide an overview of latest information on nutrition requirement during and after pregnancy
  • To portray simple ways that GPs can add effective and brief nutrition care to their standard consultation
     

Summary:

  • A balanced diet plus a supplement with folic acid and iodine is critical for good maternal health as well as offspring growth and development
  • GPs have high potential to give nutrition care that can improve the dietary habits and health outcomes of patients. Examples of improvements include:
    • An increase in fruit and vegetable intake
    • An increase in fish intake
    • A reduction in energy consumption
  • Ways to support GPs in providing nutrition care,
    • GPs need to be confident in raising topics related to nutrition (i.e. weight management) during standard consultation
    • The use of laminated desktop quotes with proposed questions to ask patients
    • Being equipped with simple and practical messages consistent with latest evidence that can be added into standard consultation (i.e. recent evidence for healthy eating during pregnancy, examples in Table 1)
       

Table 1 – Simple and evidence-based messages suitable for clinical practice

You can eat well during pregnancy and breastfeeding by:

  • Enjoying a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, of different types and colours
  • Increasing your intake of grain and cereal foods
    • Choose mostly wholegrain and high-fibre options
  • Choosing foods that are high in iron, such as lean red meat or tofu
    • Iron-rich foods are important for pregnant women
  • Making a habit of drinking milk, and eating hard cheese and yoghurt, or calcium-enriched alternatives
    • Reduced-fat varieties are best
  • Drinking plenty of water
  • Avoiding foods and drinks that are high in saturated fat, added sugar and salt

 

Related sections

Info cards

2016 Issue 2 –
Nutrition During Lactation: What’s New?

A summary of nutritional recommendations during lactation from health authorities worldwide
 

Click to read

2015 Issue 1 –
Nutrition Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care

A summary of recommendations from health experts on nutrients supplementation
 

Click to read

 

WYE-EM-212-SEP-16

Nutrition care during and after pregnancy by general practitioners

Monday, Jan 21, 2019

Reference:

Ball L, Wilkinson S. Nutrition care by general practitioners: Enhancing women's health during and after pregnancy. Aust Fam Physician. 2016 Aug;45(8):542-7. Link to Pubmed
 

Other articles that you might be interested in:

 

Background:

  • Healthy dietary habits before, during and after pregnancy help reduce the risk of undesirable health outcomes for both mothers and infants
  • Most pregnant women have ongoing and regular contact with general practitioners (GPs) and they are receptive to health-related messages
     

Objective:

  • To provide an overview of latest information on nutrition requirement during and after pregnancy
  • To portray simple ways that GPs can add effective and brief nutrition care to their standard consultation
     

Summary:

  • A balanced diet plus a supplement with folic acid and iodine is critical for good maternal health as well as offspring growth and development
  • GPs have high potential to give nutrition care that can improve the dietary habits and health outcomes of patients. Examples of improvements include:
    • An increase in fruit and vegetable intake
    • An increase in fish intake
    • A reduction in energy consumption
  • Ways to support GPs in providing nutrition care,
    • GPs need to be confident in raising topics related to nutrition (i.e. weight management) during standard consultation
    • The use of laminated desktop quotes with proposed questions to ask patients
    • Being equipped with simple and practical messages consistent with latest evidence that can be added into standard consultation (i.e. recent evidence for healthy eating during pregnancy, examples in Table 1)
       

Table 1 – Simple and evidence-based messages suitable for clinical practice

You can eat well during pregnancy and breastfeeding by:

  • Enjoying a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, of different types and colours
  • Increasing your intake of grain and cereal foods
    • Choose mostly wholegrain and high-fibre options
  • Choosing foods that are high in iron, such as lean red meat or tofu
    • Iron-rich foods are important for pregnant women
  • Making a habit of drinking milk, and eating hard cheese and yoghurt, or calcium-enriched alternatives
    • Reduced-fat varieties are best
  • Drinking plenty of water
  • Avoiding foods and drinks that are high in saturated fat, added sugar and salt

 

Related sections

Info cards

2016 Issue 2 –
Nutrition During Lactation: What’s New?

A summary of nutritional recommendations during lactation from health authorities worldwide
 

Click to read

2015 Issue 1 –
Nutrition Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care

A summary of recommendations from health experts on nutrients supplementation
 

Click to read

 


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