WNSC Hong Kong Info Card 2016 Issue 4 – All About Dietary Fiber

Tuesday, Mar 20, 2018

  • Daily dietary fiber intake calculator
  • New studies on health benefits of dietary fiber in different population groups

Other resources that you might be interested in:

Info Card 2015 Issue 2 – A Practical Guide to Understanding Prebiotics

Food Category Serving Size Scores per Serving Please Input Your Daily Number of Serving
Beans ½ cup of beans or lentils 77 points
Soy 1 cup of soymilk or ½ cup of tofu 11 point
Vegetables 1 cup of vegetables (other than lettuce) 44 points
1 cup of lettuce 2 2 points
Fruits 1 medium sized fruit (e.g. apple, banana), or 1 cup of banana smoothie 3 3 points
1 cup of juice with pulp 1 1 point
Grains
Whole grains score higher than processed grains in general
1 cup of bran 8 8 points
1 cup of oatmeal 4 4 points
1 cup of whole grains (whole-grain cereal, brown rice) 3 3 points
whole-wheat processed grains (whole-grain bread, whole-grain pasta) per 1 piece of bread or 1 cup serving 2 2 points
Processed grains (white bread, bagel, white rice, processed cereal) per 1 piece of bread or 1 cup serving 11 point
Meal, Poultry, and Fish N/A 0 point N/A
Eggs and Dairy N/A 0 point N/A
Soda N/A 0 point N/A
Your daily dietary fiber intake scores:  
< 20 points 20 – 39 points ≥ 40 points
Fiber intake should be increased in order to help control appetite and reduce the risk of health problems. Further increasing fiber intake can help improve eating satisfaction and reduce calories intake. Fiber intake is adequate, helping to control appetite and stay healthy.

WNSC Hong Kong Info Card 2016 Issue 4 – All About Dietary Fiber

Tuesday, Mar 20, 2018

  • Daily dietary fiber intake calculator
  • New studies on health benefits of dietary fiber in different population groups

Other resources that you might be interested in:

Info Card 2015 Issue 2 – A Practical Guide to Understanding Prebiotics

Food Category Serving Size Scores per Serving Please Input Your Daily Number of Serving
Beans ½ cup of beans or lentils 77 points
Soy 1 cup of soymilk or ½ cup of tofu 11 point
Vegetables 1 cup of vegetables (other than lettuce) 44 points
1 cup of lettuce 2 2 points
Fruits 1 medium sized fruit (e.g. apple, banana), or 1 cup of banana smoothie 3 3 points
1 cup of juice with pulp 1 1 point
Grains
Whole grains score higher than processed grains in general
1 cup of bran 8 8 points
1 cup of oatmeal 4 4 points
1 cup of whole grains (whole-grain cereal, brown rice) 3 3 points
whole-wheat processed grains (whole-grain bread, whole-grain pasta) per 1 piece of bread or 1 cup serving 2 2 points
Processed grains (white bread, bagel, white rice, processed cereal) per 1 piece of bread or 1 cup serving 11 point
Meal, Poultry, and Fish N/A 0 point N/A
Eggs and Dairy N/A 0 point N/A
Soda N/A 0 point N/A
Your daily dietary fiber intake scores:  
< 20 points 20 – 39 points ≥ 40 points
Fiber intake should be increased in order to help control appetite and reduce the risk of health problems. Further increasing fiber intake can help improve eating satisfaction and reduce calories intake. Fiber intake is adequate, helping to control appetite and stay healthy.


Info Card 2016 Issue 4 – Online Tool

Creation Date: Monday, Jan 16, 2017

  • Calculate your daily dietary fiber intake
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